TL;DR

On with TASK #2 from The Weekly Challenge #141. Enjoy!

The challenge

You are given positive integers, $m and $n.

Write a script to find total count of integers created using the digits of $m which is also divisible by $n.

Repeating of digits are not allowed. Order/Sequence of digits can’t be altered. You are only allowed to use (n-1) digits at the most. For example, 432 is not acceptable integer created using the digits of

  1. Also for 1234, you can only have integers having no more than three digits.

Example 1:

Input: $m = 1234, $n = 2
Output: 9

Possible integers created using the digits of 1234 are:
1, 2, 3, 4, 12, 13, 14, 23, 24, 34, 123, 124, 134 and 234.

There are 9 integers divisible by 2 such as:
2, 4, 12, 14, 24, 34, 124, 134 and 234.

Example 2:

Input: $m = 768, $n = 4
Output: 3

Possible integers created using the digits of 768 are:
7, 6, 8, 76, 78 and 68.

There are 3 integers divisible by 4 such as:
8, 76 and 68.

The questions

It’s not entirely clear to me what would happen with a number having repeated digits inside. Let’s take 1223 as an example: the sub-sequence 123 can be generated in two ways, i.e. 12 3 and 1 23. Do they count as two different ones? I’ll assume yes, definitely yes!

The solution

To generate all possible sequences, we’ll associate a bit to each position in the input $m. If the bit is 0, the digit will be ignored; otherwise, it will be taken. At this point, it will be sufficient to count from 1 up to $2^k - 2$, where $k$ is the number of bits (we subtract 2 because we can take up to $k - 1$ bits by requirement).

So, let’s start with Perl this time:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use v5.24;
use warnings;
use experimental 'signatures';
no warnings 'experimental::signatures';

sub like_numbers ($m = 1234, $n = 2) {
   my @m = split m{}mxs, $m;
   my $bits = @m;
   my $N = 2 ** $bits - 2;
   my $c = 0;
   for my $i (1 .. $N) {
      my @b = split m{}mxs, sprintf "%0${bits}b", $i;
      my $v = join '', map { $b[$_] ? $m[$_] : () } 0 .. $#m;
      ++$c unless $v % $n;
   }
   return $c;
}

say like_numbers(@ARGV);

We count, we generate the bit sequences in @b and then select the corresponding digits in @m… like we said before.

Let’s move on to Raku now:

#!/usr/bin/env raku
use v6;

sub MAIN (Int:D $m = 1234, Int:D $n = 2) {
   like-numbers($m, $n).put;
}

sub like-numbers (Str() $m, Int:D $n) {
   my @m = $m.comb(/\d/);
   my $bits = @m.elems;
   my $template = '%0' ~ $bits ~ 'b';
   my $N= 2 ** $bits - 1;
   my $c = 0;
   for 0 ^..^ $N -> $i {
      my @b = $template.sprintf($i).comb(/<[0 1]>/);
      my $v = (0 .. @m.end).map({ @b[$_] > 0 ?? @m[$_] !! '' }).join('');
      ++$c if $v %% $n;
   }
   return $c;
}

It’s a perlish translation - I suspect that some hyperoperator might come to the rescue here, but I don’t really know which 🙄

OK, enough for this week… stay safe folks!